Negentropy

negentropy

Noun

(uncountable)

• The entropy that a living thing exports to keep its own entropy low.

Has it always been so? Looking up the definition of a word and not finding the expected simple answer. I feel over time that I have a grip on the definition of entropy, then when I expect to find the opposite of entropy, I find this statement. I export entropy in order to keep my entropy low?

Generally we are referencing the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The first law is that everything is moving from order to disorder, eventually. The second law is that some isolated systems briefly move from disorder to order. Solar systems are created, dead food creates complex, ordered life, molecules are fashioned into crystals, etc… Negentropy!

We don’t speak of this as much. Frankly I’ve never looked up the word and I’m surprised at the definition. Why do I want to keep my entropy low? When the spinning top becomes sentient, is the first order of business to keep itself spinning? Apparently.

According to the definition, the top thinks, “disorder is increasing, and I will soon topple over. Let’s give this disorder to someone else, so that I will spin farther (further?). Ha! This puts a distinct “spin” on interpersonal communication.

I want to know more about “exporting”. Does this actually mean removing a state from one thing to another? Or is it like information, something that is shared but still remains? In order for the definition to work, it must be entropy that is removed so that the amount of entropy is less.

Exporting is something I need to ponder. Hmm. If I have disordered thoughts, then I take the time is order them… am I exporting or just re-arranging? If I am exporting, where do they go?

When I sneeze I am reducing the amount of virus in my body (solid evidence of exporting). And does more sneezing lead to a cure from the flu?

Frankly I’m having a hard time with this exporting concept.

About johndiestler

Retired community college professor of graphic design, multimedia and photography, and chair of the fine arts and media department.
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